Posted by on June 14, 2013 in Architecture - 44 Comments

Albert Kahn: 400 Buildings in Metro Detroit

[Above: General Motors Building Research Laboratory (c.1928) in foreground, with the General Motors Building (1922) behind and to the left. Photo by Michael G. Smith]

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Words by Dale A. Carlson

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Research by Dale A. Carlson and Michael G. Smith

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Photos by Dale A. Carlson except where otherwise noted

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The true breadth of Albert Kahn’s creative genius has yet to be fully expressed online….until now. Today, at long last, we unleash upon the public the results of six months of exhaustive, painstaking investigation into the life and work of Detroit’s greatest architect. Some call him “the man who built Detroit”, and we believe beyond any doubt that our compilation of 400 Kahn designs, stretching as far back as 1888, makes the definitive case. In The Legacy of Albert Kahn, W. Hawkins Ferry writes, “Kahn either designed himself or closely supervised the design of every building he built.” Though Legacy is widely regarded as thee authoritative word on Kahn’s lifelong output, we can’t help but question Ferry’s assertion. The stunning volume of projects completed during Kahn’s lifetime (1869-1942) would seem to preclude intimate involvement in every single work that came out of his offices. We personally know of over 1,000 more pre-1943 buildings attributed to Albert Kahn Associates, Inc. that aren’t included in this most thorough accounting of Kahn’s designs you will find anywhere online. Could any one person produce so much in a single lifetime? We invite you to decide for yourself after examining the fruits of our research. ~I♥DM

(Editor’s Note: This massive four-page web post renders most efficiently using Google Chrome or Mozilla Firefox as your browser. Throughout February and March of 2018 it will be undergoing an updating and also an expansion. When complete our database of Kahn commissions will include over 400 entries but our title will remain the same. Some images herein are reproduced under an assertion of fair use for purposes of research, education, and scholarship.)

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1. Gilbert W. Lee Residence (1888; designed by Kahn while with Mason & Rice; demolished)

201 E. Ferry, Detroit

Source: “The Legacy Of Albert Kahn”, W. Hawkins Ferry, 2nd Edition, Wayne State University Press, 1987, pgs. 9, 29

Photos reproduced courtesy of Burton Historical Collection of the Detroit Public Library

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2. William Livingstone Residence aka ʺSlumpyʺ (1892-1893; designed by Kahn while with Mason & Rice; demolished 2007)

76 Eliot, Detroit

Source: “The Legacy Of Albert Kahn”, W. Hawkins Ferry, 2nd Edition, Wayne State University Press, 1987, pgs. 9, 31

Albert Kahn Associates, Inc. file photo

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3. Interiors of Hiram Walker & Sons Offices (1894; designed by Kahn while with Mason & Rice)

2072 Riverside Drive, Windsor, Ontario, Canada

Source: “Walkerville“, a PDF document published online at www.citywindsor.ca

Photo shows second floor tasting room

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4. Watson M. Freer Residence (1895; designed by Kahn while with Mason & Rice; demolished)

111 E. Ferry, Detroit

Source: “The Legacy Of Albert Kahn”, W. Hawkins Ferry, 2nd Edition, Wayne State University Press, 1987, pgs. 9, 32

Photos reproduced courtesy of Burton Historical Collection of the Detroit Public Library

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5. Children’s Hospital (1896; Nettleton, Kahn & Trowbridge; demolished)

Approximately 4000 St. Antoine, Detroit

Source: “The Legacy Of Albert Kahn”, W. Hawkins Ferry, 2nd Edition, Wayne State University Press, 1987, pgs. 9, 33

Albert Kahn Associates, Inc. file photo

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6. Bethany Presbyterian Chapel (1897; Nettleton, Kahn & Trowbridge)

7835 E. Lafayette, Detroit

Source: “The American Architect & Building News”, Vol. 58, No. 1147, December 15, 1897, pg. 98

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7. Bernard Ginsburg Residence (1898; Nettleton & Kahn)

236 Adelaide, Detroit

Source: https://npgallery.nps.gov/AssetDetail/NRIS/91001015 AND Detroit Free Press, January 1, 1899, pg. 7

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8. James E. Scripps Residence Boiler House (1898; Nettleton & Kahn)

Grand River & Trumbull, Detroit

Source: Detroit Free Press, July 10, 1898, pg. 26 AND August 8, 1898, pg. 20 AND Jan. 1, 1899, pg. 7

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9. James E. Scripps Residence Library and Art Gallery (1898; Nettleton & Kahn; demolished 1967)

Grand River & Trumbull, Detroit

This building was originally constructed on the grounds of Scripps’ private residence at the northeast corner of Grand River & Trumbull. It was dismantled and reconstructed on the southwest corner in the 1920s, and thereafter used as a branch of the Detroit Public Library until its razing in 1967.

Source: “The Legacy Of Albert Kahn”, W. Hawkins Ferry, 2nd Edition, Wayne State University Press, 1987, pgs. 10, 33-35

Photo reproduced courtesy of Burton Historical Collection of the Detroit Public Library

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10. Grace Hospital Helen Newberry Nurses’ Home (1898; Nettleton & Kahn)

Southwest corner of John R & Willis, Detroit

Source: “The Legacy Of Albert Kahn”, W. Hawkins Ferry, 2nd Edition, Wayne State University Press, 1987, pg. 10

This structure’s design has been incorrectly attributed on occasion to Elijah Meyers, the architect of Michigan’s State Capitol in Lansing, most likely because he also designed the original Harper Hospital directly across the street.

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[Below: An historical illustration of the Grace Hospital Helen Newberry Nurses’ Home reprinted from the Detroit Free Press, November 25, 1898]

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11. Stephen A. Griggs Residence (1898; Nettleton & Kahn; demolished)

72 Seward, Detroit

Source: “The Inland Architect and News Record”, December 1898, Vol. XXXII, No. 5, pg. 50; photo reprinted from same

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12. H.W. Noble Residence (1898; Nettleton & Kahn; demolished)

127 Seward, Detroit

Source: “The Inland Architect and News Record”, March 1899, Vol. XXXIII, No. 2, pg. 20; photo reprinted from same

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13. Lander S. Harris Residence (1898; Nettleton & Kahn; demolished)

614 Pingree, Detroit

Source: “The Inland Architect and News Record”, Dec. 1898, Vol. XXXII, No. 5, pg. 50; photo reprinted from same

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14. Joseph R. McGlaughlin Residence (1899; Nettleton & Kahn; Remodeled by Smith, Hinchman & Grylls, 1911)

121 E. Boston, Detroit

Source: Detroit Free Press, May 14, 1899, pg. 11 AND Detroit Free Press, Dec. 31, 1899, pg. 9

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15. Charles S. Chapman Residence aka ʺOak Bluffʺ (c.1899; Nettleton & Kahn; demolished)

714 N. Main, Rochester

Source: Detroit Free Press, August 27, 1899, pg. 6

Digital image snipped from: http://rochesteravonhistory.blogspot.com

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[Below: An historical illustration of the Charles S. Chapman Residence reprinted from the Detroit Free Press, August 27, 1899]

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16. Professor Edward DeMille Campbell Residence (1899; Nettleton & Kahn)

1555 Washtenaw, Ann Arbor

Source: Albert Kahn Papers, Bentley Historical Library, University of Michigan

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17. George Headley Residence (1898; Nettleton & Kahn)

82 King, Detroit

Source: “The Inland Architect and News Record”, November 1898, Vol. 32, No. 4

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[Below: Two historical photos of the George Headley Residence reprinted from the November 1898 issue of “The Inland Architect and News Record”.]

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18. Ella Thayer Residence (1899; Nettleton & Kahn)

1386 E. Jefferson, Detroit

Source: National Register of Historic Places Reference #85003608

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19. Sigma Phi Fraternity House (1900; Nettleton & Kahn; demolished)

426 N. Ingalls, Ann Arbor

Source: Albert Kahn Papers, Bentley Historical Library, University of Michigan AND Detroit Free Press, September 10, 1900, pg. 11 AND Detroit Free Press, October 21, 1900, pg. 4

Digital image snipped from http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/7859144546/

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[Below: An historical illustration of the Sigma Phi Fraternity House reprinted from the Detroit Free Press, June 18, 1899]

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[Below: An historical image of the Sigma Phi Fraternity House from the back side. Library of Congress file photo.]

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20. Pierson Apartments (1900; Nettleton & Kahn; demolished)

2546-2550 Woodward, Detroit

Source: Detroit Free Press, September 3, 1899, pg. 11; photo reprinted from same

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[Below: An historical image of the Pierson Apartments. Photo reproduced courtesy of Burton Historical Collection of the Detroit Public Library.]

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21. John M. Dwyer Residence now known as Arthur J. Rohde Agency (1900; Nettleton & Kahn)

2711 E. Jefferson, Detroit

Source: ‘Albert Kahn Era Projects’, Albert Kahn Associates, Inc. Internal List of Commissions, unpublished

To the woefully misguided individual who made the decision to encase this structure in aluminum siding: May God have mercy on your soul.

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22. James D. Sanders Residence (1900; Nettleton & Kahn)

235 E. Boston, Detroit

Source: Detroit Free Press, April 2, 1899, pg. 9 AND July 30, 1899, pg. 9

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23. J. Howard Muzzy Residence (c.1900; Nettleton & Kahn)

141 Owen, Detroit

Source: Detroit Free Press, August 28, 1898, pg. 20

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24. Albert P. Sullivan Residence (c.1900-1901; Nettleton & Kahn)

99 Chandler, Detroit

Source: Detroit Free Press, April 15, 1900, pg. 11 AND May 20, 1900, pg. 31

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25. Robert W. Smiley Residence (c.1901; Nettleton & Kahn)

996 Burns, Detroit

Source: Detroit Free Press, April 14, 1901, pg. A2

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[Below: An historical illustration of the Robert W. Smiley Residence reprinted from the Detroit Free Press, April 14, 1901]

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26. Charles C. Hinchman Residence (1902; Nettleton & Kahn)

1042 Seminole, Detroit

Source: “Homes of Indian Village”, a database compiled by multiple Indian Village residents for inclusion in the neighborhood’s National Register of Historic Places application, 1973, unpublished

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27. Robert L. Robertson Residence now known as New Center Real Estate, Inc. (1901; Mason & Kahn)

3040 E. Grand Blvd, Detroit

Source: Detroit Free Press, May 26, 1901, pg. 19

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28. George A. Robinson Residence (1901-1902; Mason & Kahn)

70 Virginia Park, Detroit

Source: Detroit Free Press, October 13, 1901, pg. 11

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29.“The Palms” Apartment House aka J.B. Book Apartment Building (1902; Mason & Kahn)

1001 E. Jefferson, Detroit

Source: “AIA Guide to Detroit Architecture”, Eric J. Hill & John Gallagher, Wayne State University Press, 2003, pg. 232-233

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30. University of Michigan Hospital Psychopathic Ward Building (1902-1903; Mason & Kahn; demolished)

University of Michigan Hospital Campus, Ann Arbor

Source: Albert Kahn Papers, Bentley Historical Library, University of Michigan

Albert Kahn Associates, Inc. file photo

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31. Frederick L. Colby Detroit Residence No. 1 (1902; Mason & Kahn)

1059 Seminole, Detroit

Source: “Homes of Indian Village”, a database compiled by multiple Indian Village residents for inclusion in the neighborhood’s National Register of Historic Places application, 1973, unpublished

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32. “The Woodward” Apartments (1902; Mason & Kahn; demolished)

Approximately 30 E. Forest, Detroit

Source: Albert Kahn Papers, Bentley Historical Library, University of Michigan

Photo reproduced courtesy of Burton Historical Collection of the Detroit Public Library

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33. Century Association Clubhouse now known as Century Theater (c.1902; Mason & Kahn; George Mason-designed Gem Theater added in 1927; entire building moved from Witherell & Columbia in 1997)

333 Madison, Detroit

Source: Detroit Free Press, April 27, 1902, pg. 11-12

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[Below: An historical illustration of the Century Association Clubhouse reprinted from the Detroit Free Press, April 27, 1902]

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34. Detroit Racquet Club (1902)

626 Woodbridge, Detroit

Source: “AIA Guide to Detroit Architecture”, Eric J. Hill & John Gallagher, Wayne State University Press, 2003, pg. 28-29

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35. Delta Upsilon Fraternity House (1902-1903; remodeled and altered after fire, c.2012)

1331 Hill, Ann Arbor

Source: Albert Kahn Papers, Bentley Historical Library, University of Michigan

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36. Old Temple Beth El now known as Bonstelle Theatre (1903)

3424 Woodward, Detroit

Source: “AIA Guide to Detroit Architecture”, Eric J. Hill & John Gallagher, Wayne State University Press, 2003, pg. 110-111

In 1936, the façade of the Old Temple Beth El was altered in a far less than aesthetically pleasing fashion to accommodate a widening of Woodward Avenue.

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[Below: An historic image of the Old Temple Beth El as it appeared in its younger days. Albert Kahn Associates, Inc. file photo.]

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37. Packard Motor Car Company Plant – Original Buildings (c.1903-1904; demolished)

1580 E. Grand Blvd, Detroit

Source: ʺAlbert Kahn Era Projectsʺ, Albert Kahn Associates, Inc. Internal List of Commissions, unpublished

Kahn’s first round of designs for the Packard Plant were built in full masonry and precede the technological advances in reinforced concrete that characterize his extant, post-1905 work at this site. The last vestiges of these structures were torn down by 1916. Our historical image of the Packard Plant as it appeared in those earliest years was snipped from: http://jsah.ucpress.edu/content/72/1/78.figures-only

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38. Jacques Lawrence aka John Lawrence Residence (1903)

407 E. Kingsley, Ann Arbor

Source: Albert Kahn Papers, Bentley Historical Library, University of Michigan AND Detroit Free Press, April 29, 1900, pg. 32

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39. Frederick Andrus Residence (1903)

1022 Seminole, Detroit

Source: “Homes of Indian Village”, a database compiled by multiple Indian Village residents for inclusion in the neighborhood’s National Register of Historic Places application, 1973, unpublished

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40. William E. Metzger Automobile Dealership now known as Lusk Albertson Building (First two floors 1903, Mason & Kahn; four floor addition 1906)

409 E. Jefferson, Detroit

Source: ‘Albert Kahn Era Projects’, Albert Kahn Associates, Inc. Internal List of Commissions, unpublished

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41. Hannah Schloss Memorial Building & Jewish Institute (1903; 1908; demolished)

681 E. High, Detroit

Source: ‘Albert Kahn Era Projects’, Albert Kahn Associates, Inc. Internal List of Commissions, unpublished

Digital image snipped from: https://detroitjewishcommunityarchives.wordpress.com/2014/09/15/the-jewish-federation-of-metropolitan-detroit-a-short-history/

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42. Superior Match Company Plant (1903; demolished)

Northwest corner of Buchanon & Lawton, Detroit

Source: ‘Albert Kahn Era Projects’, Albert Kahn Associates, Inc. Internal List of Commissions, unpublished

Digital image snipped from: http://jsah.ucpress.edu/content/72/1/78.figures-only

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43. Belle Isle Aquarium (1904; Mason & Kahn and Nettleton & Kahn)

Near Loiter Way & Inselruhe, Belle Isle, Detroit

Source: “AIA Guide to Detroit Architecture”, Eric J. Hill & John Gallagher, Wayne State University Press, 2003, pg. 262-263

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44. Belle Isle Conservatory (1904; Mason & Kahn and Nettleton & Kahn)

Near Loiter Way & Inselruhe, Belle Isle, Detroit

Source: “AIA Guide to Detroit Architecture”, Eric J. Hill & John Gallagher, Wayne State University Press, 2003, pg. 264-265

Second photo by Michael G. Smith

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[Below: An historical illustration of the Belle Isle Conservatory reprinted from the Detroit Free Press, November 1, 1901]

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45. West Hall aka West Engineering Building (1904; Mason & Kahn)

Southeast corner of University of Michigan Central Campus Diag, Ann Arbor

Source: http://bentley.umich.edu/legacy-support/campus_tour/buildingslist.php

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46. Walkerville Town Hall (1904)

350 Devonshire, Windsor, Ontario, Canada

Source: “Walkerville“, a PDF document published online at www.citywindsor.ca

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47. Hiram Walker Employee Houses – Multiple Structures (1904)

800 Block of Monmouth Road, Windsor, Ontario, Canada

Source: “Walkerville“, a PDF document published online at www.citywindsor.ca

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48. Russell Sloman Residence (c.1904; demolished)

274 E. Hancock, Detroit

Source: “American Architect & Building News”, November 9, 1907, pg. 1663; photo reprinted from same

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49. Frank C. McMath Residence (1904)

1037 Iroquois, Detroit

Source: ʺAlbert Kahn Era Projectsʺ, Albert Kahn Associates, Inc. Internal List of Commissions, unpublished

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50. Detroit Savings Bank Branch (c.1904; demolished)

Approximately 11600 E. Jefferson, Detroit

Source: ‘Albert Kahn Era Projects’, Albert Kahn Associates, Inc. Internal List of Commissions, unpublished

Digital image snipped from:

http://webapp1.dlib.indiana.edu/images/splash.htm?scope=images/VAC5094

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51. American Arithmometer Company Plant aka Burroughs Adding Machine Company Plant #1 (1904; demolished)

2nd & Amsterdam, Detroit

Source: Detroit Free Press, July 24, 1904, pg. 7; photo reprinted from same

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[An historical Albert Kahn Associates, Inc. drawing of the American Arithmometer Plant snipped from: http://jsah.ucpress.edu/content/72/1/78.figures-only]

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[The American Arithmometer Plant under construction in 1904. Digital image snipped from: http://jsah.ucpress.edu/content/72/1/78.figures-only]

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52. Burroughs Adding Machine Company Plant #2 (1905; demolished)

2nd & Amsterdam, Detroit

Source: “Manufacturers’ Record”, November 16, 1904, Vol. XLVIII, No. 18, pg. 460; photo reprinted from same

In 1905 the American Arithmometer Company changed its name to Burroughs Adding Machine Company and built their second Detroit plant directly to the southwest of the original 1904 plant pictured in the preceding entry.

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53. Woodlawn Cemetery Mortuary Chapel aka Rosa L. Parks Freedom Chapel (1905)

19975 Woodward, Detroit

Source: Albert Kahn Papers, Bentley Historical Library, University of Michigan

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54. Charles M. Swift Residence (1905; demolished)

17800 E. Jefferson @ Dodge Place, Grosse Pointe

Source: “Buildings of Detroit”, W. Hawkins Ferry, Wayne State University Press, 1968, pgs. 264, 279, 297

Manning Brothers file photo

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55. Burnham S. Colburn Residence (c.1905)

1007 Burns, Detroit

Source: Detroit Free Press, August 13, 1905, pg. 7

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56. Stephen A. Griggs Residence (c.1905-1907)

889 Kildare, Windsor, Ontario, Canada

Source: “Walkerville“, a PDF document published online at www.citywindsor.ca

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57. Collegiate Sorosis House now known as Triangle Fraternity House (1905-1906)

1501 Washtenaw, Ann Arbor

Source: Albert Kahn Papers, Bentley Historical Library, University of Michigan

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58. King Edward School Entryway (1905; original school on Victoria Avenue demolished and new school built with historic entryway in 1993)

Approximately 851 Chilver, Windsor, Ontario, Canada

Source: https://www.publicboard.ca/school/kingedward/About%20Us/Pages/School-History.aspx

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59. Arthur Kiefer Residence (1905)

1091 Seminole, Detroit

Source: ʺAlbert Kahn Era Projectsʺ, Albert Kahn Associates, Inc. Internal List of Commissions, unpublished

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60. Scripps Power Building (c.1905; unbuilt)

North side of Congress between 1st & 2nd, Detroit

Source: Detroit Free Press, June 25, 1905, pg. B4; photo reprinted from same

From June 2013 to March 2018 we erroneously reported this building as “demolished”. Further research has led us to the conclusion that it was, in fact, never built.

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61. Phoenix Club now known as King David Grand Lodge Masonic Temple (1905)

114 Erskine @ John R, Detroit

Source: Detroit Free Press, July 16, 1905, pg. 26

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[Below: An illustration of the Phoenix Club reprinted from the July 16, 1905 issue of the Detroit Free Press.]

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62. Packard Motor Car Company Plant  – Building No. 10 (1905-1906)

1580 E. Grand Blvd, Detroit

Source: “The Legacy Of Albert Kahn”, Second Edition, W. Hawkins Ferry, Wayne State University Press, 1987, pgs. 11, 41-42

Keep in mind while examining the years of construction we’ve reported here and in the entries below that nearly all of the buildings Kahn designed at the Packard Plant after 1905 utilized his company’s revolutionary advances in reinforced concrete technology that allowed for subsequent additions of entire floors. In the past we reported most of these post-1905 structures as “derelict” but a recent buyer’s attempts to renovate and revive the property compel us to modify our appraisal of their condition to “currently unknown”.

Albert Kahn Associates, Inc. file photo

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63. Packard Motor Car Company Plant – Main Building (c.1906-1912)

1580 E. Grand Blvd, Detroit

Source: “Buildings”, Bryant & Detwiler Company, Detroit, 1921, pg. 8; photo reprinted from same

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[Below: An historical photograph of the Packard Plant’s Main Building reprinted from “Albert Kahn Architectural Catalog, October 1921”]

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64. Packard Motor Car Company Plant – Stock Building (c.1906-1912)

1580 E. Grand Blvd, Detroit

Source: “Buildings”, Bryant & Detwiler Company, Detroit, 1921, pg. 8; photo reprinted from same

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65. Packard Motor Car Company Plant – 2nd Powerhouse (c.1907)

1580 E. Grand Blvd, Detroit

Source: “Buildings”, Bryant & Detwiler Company, Detroit, 1921, pg. 28; photo reprinted from same

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66. Packard Motor Car Company Plant – Manufacturing Building (c.1906-1912)

1580 E. Grand Blvd, Detroit

Source: “Buildings”, Bryant & Detwiler Company, Detroit, 1921, pg. 11; photo reprinted from same

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67. Packard Motor Car Company Plant – Spare Parts Plant & Warehouse (c.1906-1912)

1580 E. Grand Blvd, Detroit

Source: “Buildings”, Bryant & Detwiler Company, Detroit, 1921, pg. 11; photo reprinted from same

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[Below: The Packard Motor Car Company Spare Parts Plant and Warehouse as it appeared in 1917. Albert Kahn Associates, Inc. file photo]

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68. Packard Motor Car Company Plant – Manufacturing Building (c.1906-1912)

1580 E. Grand Blvd, Detroit

Source: “Buildings”, Bryant & Detwiler Company, Detroit, 1921, pg. 11; photo reprinted from same

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69. Willistead Manor aka E. Chandler Walker Residence (1906)

1899 Niagara, Windsor, Ontario, Canada

Source: “Buildings of Detroit”, W. Hawkins Ferry, Wayne State University Press, 1968, pgs. 264, 280

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70. Willistead Manor Garage and Guesthouse (1906)

1899 Niagara, Windsor, Ontario, Canada

Source: “Buildings of Detroit”, W. Hawkins Ferry, Wayne State University Press, 1968, pgs. 264, 280

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71. Willistead Manor Gatehouse (1906)

1899 Niagara, Windsor, Ontario, Canada

Source: “Buildings of Detroit”, W. Hawkins Ferry, Wayne State University Press, 1968, pgs. 264, 280

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72. Andrew Ridout Residence (c.1906)

873 Kildare, Windsor, Ontario, Canada

Source: “Walkerville“, a PDF document published online at www.citywindsor.ca

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73. Ferry Athletic Field Gate (1906; demolished)

University of Michigan Campus (Approximately where U of M’s baseball stadium now stands), Ann Arbor

Source: http://bentley.umich.edu/athdept/stadium/stadtext/ferry.htm

Photo reprinted from: “The American Architect” Vol. 98, No. 1812, September 14, 1910

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[Below: An historical photo of bricklayers standing before the newly constructed Ferry Athletic Field Gate. Digital image snipped from: http://bentley.umich.edu/athdept/stadium/stadtext/ferry.htm]

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74. Strathcona Block (1906-1907)

1958-1998 Wyandotte, Windsor, Ontario, Canada

Source: “Walkerville“, a PDF document published online at www.citywindsor.ca

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75. Ambery-Isaacs Residence aka “Foxley” (1906-1907)

811 Devonshire, Windsor, Ontario, Canada

Source: “Walkerville“, a PDF document published online at www.citywindsor.ca

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76. Albert Kahn Residence aka Detroit Urban League (1906)

208 Mack, Detroit

Source: “Buildings of Detroit”, W. Hawkins Ferry, Wayne State University Press, 1968, pgs. 267, 295

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77. Allen F. Edwards Residence (1906)

1032 Seminole, Detroit

Source: “Homes of Indian Village”, a database compiled by multiple Indian Village residents for inclusion in the neighborhood’s National Register of Historic Places application, 1973, unpublished

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78. Gustavus D. Pope Residence (1906)

1040 Iroquois, Detroit

Source: “Homes of Indian Village”, a database compiled by multiple Indian Village residents for inclusion in the neighborhood’s National Register of Historic Places application, 1973, unpublished

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79. John Owen Residence (1906)

1411 Iroquois, Detroit

Source: “Homes of Indian Village”, a database compiled by multiple Indian Village residents for inclusion in the neighborhood’s National Register of Historic Places application, 1973, unpublished

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80. Arthur M. Pelletrean Residence (1906)

1424 Iroquois, Detroit

Source: “Homes of Indian Village”, a database compiled by multiple Indian Village residents for inclusion in the neighborhood’s National Register of Historic Places application, 1973, unpublished

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81. Cranbrook House also known as George Gough and Ellen Scripps Booth Residence (1907)

380 Lone Pine Rd, Bloomfield Hills

Source: “Buildings of Detroit”, W. Hawkins Ferry, Wayne State University Press, 1968, pgs. 267, 283

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82. Bank of Commerce (1907)

415 Devonshire, Windsor, Ontario, Canada

Source: “Walkerville“, a PDF document published online at www.citywindsor.ca

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83. John F. Bush Residence (1907)

1410 Iroquois, Detroit

Source: “Homes of Indian Village”, a database compiled by multiple Indian Village residents for inclusion in the neighborhood’s National Register of Historic Places application, 1973, unpublished

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84. Francis ‘Fred’ Holt Residence (c.1907)

250 E. Boston, Detroit

Source: “The Inland Architect and News Record”, 1906, Vol. 48, No. 1

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85. Country Club of Detroit Clubhouse No. 1 (1907; demolished 1920s)

12 Lakeshore Rd, Grosse Pointe Farms

Source: “Buildings of Detroit”, W. Hawkins Ferry, Wayne State University Press, 1968, pgs. 190, 200 AND http://www.ccofd.com/club/scripts/section/section.asp?NS=HISTORY

From June of 2013 to March of 2018 I♥DM erroneously reported the location of this structure as “Fisher Road & E. Jefferson, Detroit”. While the intersection was more or less correct, we were obviously way off on the municipality.

Library of Congress file photo

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♦ ♦ ♦

[Below: Historical photographs and plans of the Country Club of Detroit’s 1st clubhouse reprinted from the April 1910 issue of “The Brickbuilder”]

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86. Cook Farm Company Building aka Trussed Concrete Building aka Truscon Building aka Owen & Company Furniture Building (1907; demolished 1957)

Lafayette & Shelby, Detroit

Source: “The Legacy Of Albert Kahn”, W. Hawkins Ferry, 2nd Edition, Wayne State University Press, 1987, pg. 13-14, 54

Albert Kahn Associates, Inc. file photo

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[Below: An historical illustration of the Truscon Building reprinted from the Detroit News Tribune, January 27, 1907]

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87. National Bank of Commerce (1907; demolished)

144 W. Fort, Detroit

Source: “The Architectural Forum”, Vol. 32, No. 4, April 1920, pg. 139 AND “The City of Detroit, Michigan, 1701-1922”, Volume 1, Clarence Monroe Burton, 1922, pg. 662

Photo reprinted from: Albert Kahn Papers, Bentley Historical Library, University of Michigan

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88. Lewis H. Jones Residence (c.1907; Moved from 8191 E. Jefferson, Detroit to its present location in 1920s)

41 Provencal, Grosse Pointe Farms

Source: ʺAlbert Kahn Era Projectsʺ, Albert Kahn Associates, Inc. Internal List of Commissions, unpublished

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89. Chalmers Motor Car Company Offices and Plant (1907; demolished)

South side of E. Jefferson between Lycaste and Canal, Detroit

Source: “The American Auto Factory”, Byron Olsen and Joseph P. Cabadas, MBI Publishing Company, St. Paul, 2002, pgs. 38-39

Photo reproduced courtesy of Burton Historical Collection of the Detroit Public Library

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90. Standard Auto Company Garage and Showroom now known as Museum of Contemporary Art Detroit (1907)

Woodward & Garfield, Detroit

Source: Albert Kahn Papers, Bentley Historical Library, University of Michigan

Photo by Michael G. Smith

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91. Garfield Building aka Edwin S. George Building (1st & 2nd floors 1909; top 3 floors 1914)

4612 Woodward, Detroit

Source: “AIA Guide to Detroit Architecture”, Eric J. Hill & John Gallagher, Wayne State University Press, 2003, pgs. 114-115

Photo by Michael G. Smith

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[Below: An historical illustration of the Garfield Building reprinted from the Detroit Free Press, January 17, 1909]

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92. Parke-Davis Laboratory Building – 4th Story Addition (1908)

400 River Place Dr, Detroit

Source: “AIA Guide to Detroit Architecture”, Eric J. Hill & John Gallagher”, Wayne State University Press, 2003, pg. 242

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93. Parke-Davis Laboratory Building – 4th Story Addition (1908)

500 River Place Dr, Detroit

Source: “AIA Guide to Detroit Architecture”, Eric J. Hill & John Gallagher, Wayne State University Press, 2003, pg. 242

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♦ ♦ ♦

94. Grinnell Brothers Music Store Building (1908)

1515-1521 Woodward, Detroit

Source: “The Legacy Of Albert Kahn”, W. Hawkins Ferry, 2nd Edition, Wayne State University Press, 1987, pgs. 14, 55

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♦ ♦ ♦

[Below: An historical image of the Grinnell Brothers Music Store. Albert Kahn Associates, Inc. file photo]

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95. Cranbrook House Tower Cottage (1908; altered by Burrowes & Wells 1913; altered by Swanson & Booth 1925)

380 Lone Pine, Bloomfield Hills

Source: “The Campus Guide: Cranbrook”, Kathryn Bishop Eckert, Princeton Architectural Press, 2001, pgs. 29-30

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♦ ♦ ♦

96. James Edmund Scripps Memorial (1908)

Woodmere Cemetery, 9400 Fort, Detroit

Source: ʺAlbert Kahn Era Projectsʺ, Albert Kahn Associates, Inc. Internal List of Commissions, unpublished

We personally examined the historical architectural drawing held by Albert Kahn Associates, Inc. that prove this memorial came out of their offices. Have your own first-hand look at this memorial through the slightly dusty glass doors of the Scripps Mausoleum at Woodmere Cemetery in Southwest Detroit.

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97. American Electrical Heater Company Building aka American Beauty Electric Irons Company Building (1908; demolished 2012)

6110 Cass, Detroit

Source: “The Architectural Record”, July 1912, Volume 1, No. 7, pg. 82

Photo by Michael G. Smith

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♦ ♦ ♦

[Below: An historical architectural drawing of the American Electrical Heater Company Building reprinted from the June 19, 1912 issue of “The American Architect”]

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98. Senator James J. Couzens Detroit Residence (1909; 1922)

Northwest corner of 2nd & Longfellow, Detroit

Source: Albert Kahn Papers, Bentley Historical Library, University of Michigan

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♦ ♦ ♦

99. Hugh Chalmers Residence (1909-1910)

1453 Iroquois, Detroit

Source: Albert Kahn Papers, Bentley Historical Library, University of Michigan

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♦ ♦ ♦

100. Herman Krolik Residence (1909-1910)

226 Mack, Detroit

Source: ‘Albert Kahn Era Projects’, Albert Kahn Associates, Inc. Internal List of Commissions, unpublished

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About the author

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Dale Carlson grew up along the northeastern shores of Lake Michigan, where at a young age Detroit called out to him in his dreams. In 2008, after extended stays in ten different Michigan cities, the author settled permanently in southeast Oakland County where he currently lives and works in various capacities within the local real estate industry.